EDITORIAL: One year after tragedy

Anniversary of Amanda Todd's death is Thursday, and while world isn't any safer we have learned a few things

Is the world a safer place for kids since Port Coquitlam teen Amanda Todd killed herself on Oct. 10, 2012 after posting that heart-wrenching video seen around the world? No, but we have learned a few things since.

We’ve learned, for example, that the internet can be a rough, cruel world for kids unless they are taught how to protect themselves and their privacy — and we know that the internet is a powerful tool for ruining someone’s reputation.

We’ve seen that vulnerable girls and boys are easily exploited online by voyeurs who lure them with false names and post their pictures and videos, sometimes with devastating consequences.

We learned, as well, that rape culture is so deeply ingrained in our society that Canadian university students didn’t see anything wrong with frosh week chants about sex with underage girls until authorities found out and put a stop to it.

We’ve learned that it’s easy to troll the internet for photos and then post them, without consent, as a Facebook dating chat room did with a picture of Rehtaeh Parsons (the Nova Scotia teen who committed suicide after photos of an alleged gang-rape were posted).

Simply put, laws are inadequate for dealing with meanness and stupidity on the web. Even Port Coquitlam couldn’t find a way to legislate against bullying.

But there has been some action. Various services have been highlighted, such as B.C.’s ERASE Bullying website, Kids Help Phone, and more discussions are taking place on the subject.

Will all this talk prevent another Amanda Todd situation from occurring?

Maybe not, but we can no longer have ignorance as an excuse.

 

Black Press