In defence of the government

Resident stands by the activities of the Conservative Party

Richard Rolke’s recent column, No decorum at the forum, is a sad reflection on what NDP, Liberal and Green party supporters consider a rational and open debate on the party policies being presented in the current federal election. Emotions, rather than critical thinking, seem to be the main contributor to what Rolke identifies as their childish behaviour.

Unfortunately, the emotions being so freely displayed are too often based on spin, half-truths, facts taken out of context and blatant misrepresentation of many of the Conservative government’s actions while they have been in power.

They have been far from perfect but in spite of the other parties’ claims to the contrary, they have enabled Canada to better withstand these turbulent times than most countries in a world beset by ever increasing economic and security problems.

As a veteran with 35 years of service in the Canadian army, I would like to dispel one of the current half-truths being spun by the opposition and media, the one where all veterans have been poorly served by the Conservative government.

Not only am I veteran but so is my brother and both my parents, and my wife’s parents are Second World War veterans. Not one of us would complain about the service provided by Veterans’ Affairs.

There have been some problems, particularly with giving disabled soldiers a lump sum of money rather than a pension, but these issues have been recognized and are being rectified through practical measures.

These measures should not include reopening under utilized Veterans’ Affairs centres to deal with a dwindling client base as the funds can be used much more efficiently in providing necessary services for those most in need of them.

During my service, I had the privilege of taking studies on geopolitical and economic matters in Canada, the U.K., Australia and the U.S.

This experience makes me realize that many of the NDP, Liberal and Green policies on these issues are at best wishful thinking and at worst will be detrimental to a prosperous and secure Canada in the future.

Stand firm Mr. Arnold and don’t buckle under the pressure of dealing with hostile audiences as Rolke suggests you might do. Overall, the Conservative Party’s policies are much more likely to successfully deal with future challenges our country will face than anything else on offer. The Canadian electorate would be wise to spurn unrealistic promises of getting something for nothing and realizing that bigger government never provides effective, long-term solutions.

Mike Newman

Lumby

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Vernon Fire Rescue Services responded a structure fire on Valleyview Place Jan. 26, 2021, around 5 p.m. (Brendan Shykora - Vernon Morning Star)
Vernon firefighters knock down fully involved basement blaze

All occupants of the home got out safely but have been displaced, their home extensively damaged

Vernon Winter Carnival Cop John Fawcett, left, and Carnival director Paul Cousins sell raffle tickets for a 2019 Polaris Snowmobile, plus $1,000 worth of gear from BDM Motorsports.(Roger Knox - Morning Star)
Carnival ropes in fun amid Vernon’s winter/COVID blues

Plenty of virtual, and a few in-person, events planned for Feb. 5-14

A man looks at a plan for an ice sculpture in Polson Park that will be part of the 61st annual Vernon Winter Carnival Drive-Thru Ice Park Feb. 5-14. Construction of the ice park is underway. (Roger Knox- Morning Star)
Vernon Winter Carnival Ice Park construction begins

Virtual drive-thru event runs each day and night of 61st annual Carnival in Polson Park Feb. 5-14

Amber Piché is the new export navigator advisor for the Thompson-Okanagan region. (Photo contributed)
Exporting possible for Okanagan businesses

Provincial Export Navigator program supports entrepreneurs with free advice from export specialists

Dr. Penny Ballem, a former deputy health minister, discusses her role in leading B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccination program, at the B.C. legislature, Jan. 22, 2021. (B.C. government)
B.C. holds steady with 407 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday

14 deaths, no new outbreaks in the health care system

Kelowna International Airport. —Image: Capital News file
Williams Lake medevac flight encounters drone at Kelowna International Airport

The airport is a no-drone zone to keep aircraft safe at all times

Oliver Fire Department. (Submitted photo)
Chimney fire spreads to roof of Okanagan home

Fire crews had to return twice to the house and go through the roof to find the flames

SAR crews worked late into the night Tuesday to rescue an injured snowboarder in North Vancouver. (Facebook/North Shore Rescue)
Complicated, dangerous rescue saves man in avalanche near Cypress Mountain

North Shore SAR team braves considerable conditions to reach injured snowboarder

A Cessna 170 airplane similar to the one pictured above is reported to be missing off the waters between Victoria and Washington State. Twitter photo/USCG
UPDATE: No sign of small plane that went down in waters south of Vancouver Island

Searchers out on both sides of border between Victoria and Port Angeles

In this undated image made from a video taken by the Duke of Sussex and posted on @SaveChildrenUK by the Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, shows the Duchess of Sussex reading the book “Duck! Rabbit!” to their son Archie who celebrates his first birthday on Wednesday May 6, 2020. The Canadian Paediatric Society is reminding families that the process of raising a reader starts from birth. (Duke of Sussex/@SaveChildrenUK)
Canadian Paediatric Society says raising a reader starts from birth

CPS says literacy is one of the strongest predictors of lifelong health outcomes

Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Minister Carla Qualtrough responds to a question during a news conference Thursday August 20, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Easing rules for parental benefits created inequities among parents, documents say

Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough’s office says the government will make any necessary changes

People walk along a pedestrianized zone of Sainte-Catherine street in Montreal, Monday, May 18, 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. Newly released statistics point to a major drop in police-recorded crime during the first eight months of the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
Crime down in first 8 months of pandemic, but mental health calls rise: StatCan

The agency says violent crimes such as assault dropped significantly

Cowichan Tribes chief Squtxulenhuw (William Seymour) confirmed the first death in the First Nations community from COVID-19. (File photo)
Cowichan Tribes confirms 1st death amid growing COVID-19 outbreak

Shelter-in-place order has been extended to Feb. 5

Most Read