Nuisance deer

Resident concerned about the large deer population in Okanagan Landing

I wish to add our support to the concern that Eva Pope raised in a letter Nov. 7 entitled, “Councillors missing the mark.”

We too live in the dense deer population area near Tronson and Bella Vista roads.

We want to urge the council and the provincial ministry to cull the population of deer in our area.

They have become quite a nuisance and are very aggressive, the juveniles of this year even more so.  They are urban-born, raised and fed off our property.

They will even eat plants labelled uneatable by deer; they don’t read the labels.

I wish to provide this discussion with a list of problems, serious and otherwise, that we know of.

On Oct. 26 in the evening, a doe jumped in front of my vehicle, costing us more than $3,600 in repairs.

Three days later, when our black Lab was let out at night, a deer attacked him.

This is only the third deer attack on dogs in the area that we know of.

When my wife goes jogging in the morning down to Kin Beach, she has at times been charged by deer.  They would only leave when she charged them in defense, seemingly the only self-defense.

One summer ago, a daughter walking our Lab on a leash was encircled by two does on Tronson Road.

They would not leave even when a pickup came by and honked the horn. She had to escape by climbing into the pickup.

Their presence invites the coyotes to come down from the hills behind us.

I grew up on a farm and these animals remind me of overgrown rats who can eat anything in sight and they have done so on our property: cherries, grapes, roses, raspberries, cedars, golden chain shrub bark, currants, blackberries, lettuce, sunflowers, lilacs, and who knows what else.

There simply are too many of them and they like the readily-prepared smorgasbord here.

We try to grow our own food and we are losing the battle.

Fencing is not the solution here since they have been known to jump eight-foot fences in the neighbourhood.

We are also losing a lot of sleep because our Lab gets agitated at all hours of the night by these nightly visitors.

They will stand on the front veranda by the glass door in broad daylight and look at the wife and dog working in the kitchen.  Enough is enough.

Peter Wiebe and Regina Picco

Vernon