Cyclists from Lake Country celebrate reaching the north end of the Okanagan Rail Trail at kilometre zero. 
(Friends of Okanagan Rail Trail - Contributed)

Cyclists from Lake Country celebrate reaching the north end of the Okanagan Rail Trail at kilometre zero. (Friends of Okanagan Rail Trail - Contributed)

LETTER: Okanagan Rail Trail needs rules

Morning Star reader encounters trouble with e-bikes

Recently, I was passed on the left by a cyclist going too fast who did not indicate he was passing on my left at all.

He hit my bike, catapulting me off mine and into the rock face next to me. This man said he was sorry and continued on.

The tragic result for me was a broken left clavicle, shock and my heart went into arterial fibrillation.

A wonderful young family stopped to clean my many lacerations and calm me down. This being said, I had multiple kilometres to cycle, before I could be driven to the hospital for medical attention.

In my opinion, just like the Sea Wall in Vancouver, the Rail Trail, should be divided into two halves, for walkers and wheeled devices.

Without this, as it gains even more popularity, it is frankly dangerous.

Families with toddlers and strollers and dogs are unpredictable.

Bicycles are fast and unpredictable. Most cyclists have no idea of the rules of the road.

And why are there people racing in groups to get to Oyama on e-bikes which go up to 50 kilometres per hour and in groups of racers thinking they are on the Tour de France. Gravel flies, they swerve.

They have no idea what apprehension this causes others who are out for leisure. They should be on the paved road if they cannot go a slow to moderate speed.

The Rail Trail should be enjoyed by all, not be reduced to a highway for racing bike groups and e-bike abusers.

Katherine Henderson