Lumby photographer Doug Jones is showing this image of Kuskanax Creek near Nakusp along with his other “Innerscapes” at the Village Gallery for the month of November.

Lumby photographer Doug Jones is showing this image of Kuskanax Creek near Nakusp along with his other “Innerscapes” at the Village Gallery for the month of November.

Lumby photographer shows his ‘Innerscapes’

Inspired by land, sky and water, Lumby photographer Doug Jones shows his photos of the natural landscape at the Village Gallery in November.

The Monashee Mountains loom large near Doug Jones’ home.

Inspired by land, sky and water, the Lumby photographer has visited the natural landscape around him, both near and far, to capture what he calls “Innerscapes” with his camera.

His world view can now be seen in print form with an exhibition of his photographs currently on display at the Village Gallery in Lumby.

“Because my work is about the landscape and my connection to it, photography is the ideal medium because it requires me to be fully present at the moment of creation,” said Jones.

He began his photography career at the age of 19 with a 35-millimetre camera, which he carried into the wilderness of California’s Sierra Nevada range for the summer. Jones fell in love with the unspoiled solitude of clear blue sky, glacier-carved granite ramparts, and ancient pines growing out of solid rock on windswept ridges.

For the past 25 years, Jones has travelled extensively throughout western U.S. and Canada, creating a body of his unique natural landscape photographs. He has also photographed weddings and equestrian events, designed and created a photographic trade show display, served as a high school yearbook photography advisor, and volunteered as a production photographer for a local theatre company.

Now retired from teaching in the public school system, Jones continues to pursue his art, traveling in search of new landscapes that continue to inspire and deepen his connection to the earth.

“I believe that every person has a powerful, but largely unconscious connection with the landscape, often the landscapes of their childhood, but also of other places where significant events in their lives have occurred,” he said. “My work is about my connection to the landscape, and my hope as an artist is that you will engage in a dialogue with these images, and make a connection with your own landscape, memories, and emotions.”

The Village Gallery hosts Jones as an inaugural guest artist in its new space, located at 1975 Vernon St. (Highway 6).  The show continues until the end of November.  Call (778) 473-3029 for info.

To see more of Jones’ work, visit www.DougJonesPhotography.com.