Air tankers working on Dry Lake fire near Princeton. Facebook                                Air tankers working on Dry Lake fire near Princeton. Photo Faye Davidson

Air tankers working on Dry Lake fire near Princeton. Facebook Air tankers working on Dry Lake fire near Princeton. Photo Faye Davidson

UPDATE: Another wildfire sparks near Dry Lake, north of Princeton

This is the second fire in the area this month

UPDATE: 2:45 p.m.

The Dry Lake South fire remains at 5 hectares in size and is approximately 5 km east of Highway 5A.

This is the second blaze in the Dry Lake area, the first fire sparked back on Aug. 2 and was about 1.3 km from this latest fire.

BC Wildfire has 11 personnel on site along with three pieces of heavy equipment and one helicopter.

There are no structures threatened and the blaze is suspected to be lightning caused.

————

ORIGINAL:

Another blaze has sparked in the Kamloops wildfire region.

The Dry Lake South fire is located east of Highway 5A and north of Princeton.

It is currently estimated at 5 hectares in size.

The fire sparked sometime on Aug. 18 and the cause of the blaze is unknown.

This is the second fire in the Dry Lake area this month, on Aug. 2 a 25-hectare blaze was started by lightning. The Dry Lake fire is listed as under control by the BC Wildfire Service.

Air tankers have been spotted collecting water from Otter Lake near Princeton, for the Dry Lake blaze.

BC Wildfire crews are on the scene of three other fires in the Central and South Okanagan, with the Mount Christie blaze classified as the largest fire at 1,400 hectares.

READ MORE: Mount Christie wildfire grows to 1,400 hectares, evacuation orders and alerts in effect

August is the busiest month of the summer for wildfires due to the hot and tinder-dry conditions mixed with routine lightning storms.

Temperature records have been set across the Okanagan for the last two days, as conditions are tinder dry in the region.

READ MORE: Wildfire burns across border with Osoyoos

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

bcwildfire