B.C. Liberal Party leadership candidates Dianne Watts, Mike de Jong, Sam Sullivan, Todd Stone, Michael Lee and Andrew Wilkinson attended a debate Sunday at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre in Nanaimo. (GREG SAKAKI/The News Bulletin)

B.C. Liberal Party leadership candidates Dianne Watts, Mike de Jong, Sam Sullivan, Todd Stone, Michael Lee and Andrew Wilkinson attended a debate Sunday at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre in Nanaimo. (GREG SAKAKI/The News Bulletin)

B.C. Liberal leadership candidates debate different paths for party

Third debate held Sunday, Nov. 19 at Nanaimo’s Vancouver Island Conference Centre

The B.C. Liberals’ leadership debate Sunday in Nanaimo underlined some of the different ways the party could be headed.

Six candidates – Dianne Watts, Mike de Jong, Sam Sullivan, Todd Stone, Michael Lee and Andrew Wilkinson – attended the forum at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre to talk about transportation, education and other topics.

As the party chooses a new leader, Wilkinson said the Liberals can be proud of their record of economic prosperity and balanced budgets in B.C.

“We’re going to see the NDP on a spending marathon in the years to come and we have to be a party to stand up for balanced budgets, stand up for fiscal responsibility and make sure we don’t spend money we don’t have,” he said.

Lee noted that the Liberals won only one seat on Vancouver Island and suggested the party underperformed in urban ridings, as well.

“It’s not because we don’t care. We just didn’t demonstrate it,” he said. “So issues around affordability, issues around transportation, we need to plan better and we need to articulate that better. That’s the reason we need a different approach. We’re not going to regain seats on this Island or in urban ridings just by talking about balanced budgets and a triple-A credit rating.”

Sullivan talked about privatization of liquor sales, some privatization of health care and even of education with talk of charter schools.

De Jong expanded on previously pitched notions of government decentralization.

“Where is it written in this age of technology that government must all be located in Victoria?” he asked. “Is it revolutionary to at least consider the possibility that the B.C. Ferries corporation could be headquartered in Nanaimo? We can do it with various departments of government.”

Ferries were an area of focus at Sunday’s debate and Watts said the fares are making the crossings unaffordable.

“When you look at the system and you look at how it functions and how it moves, we need to be making sure that we have affordability built into that entire system,” she said.

Stone, former transportation minister, said the ferry system wasn’t sustainable four and a half years ago.

“Because of tough decisions, because of sacrifices in coastal British Columbia, it is sustainable and fares can now start to come down,” he said.

Stone said he wishes to continue to reduce fares and said sports teams and school groups should get free ferry service, a concept Wilkinson questioned.

“My core principle as a B.C. Liberal is you don’t spend your kids’ money on operating costs today. You pay your own way,” he said.

Sullivan suggested B.C. could take the example of the Washington state ferries and look to reduce staffing on vessels to provide more service in other ways.

“I believe that a lot of the regulations are too tough…” he said. “I’d like to be able to challenge the federal regulators and see if we could get a much more effective, cost-efficient ferry service.”

Candidates were allowed two opportunities to directly question one another and Stone directed both his queries at Watts. First he said, “You talk about a new vision for British Columbia … but the details of that vision have been pretty limited,” and then suggested that she could have done more, as a Conservative MP, to help the B.C. Liberals in last spring’s election.

“I have to be honest. I didn’t really see that contribution from you and it could have made a difference. We might not be having this discussion today,” Stone said.

Watts replied that she “didn’t realize I carried that much power that if I had done more that we would have won, but thank you for that,” and said she did try to support provincial Liberal candidates in her federal riding.

De Jong left the debate early to fly back to his Abbotsford riding to attend a celebration of life for a police officer killed in the line of duty, Const. John Davidson, but as he left, de Jong said all of the candidates are good people and “it speaks well of who our party is.”

He said the B.C. Liberals’ path back to government will involve visiting every corner of the province and listening to people.

“And generate the ideas from within our communities and within our party and take that vision to British Columbia rooted in the free-enterprise principles that have made this party great and have made British Columbia the envy of Canada,” he said.

The party will choose its next leader the first week of February.



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

The spectacular Okanagan Rail Trail from Coldstream. (Linda Busch photo)
Get Outdoors! And explore North Okanagan trails

But, remember to uphold good trail etiquette

A Vernon councillor is facing potential legal action from a former city councillor. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)
Diversity debate leaves Vernon politician threatened with legal action

Coun. Dalvir Nahal alleged to have defamed a former politician, who is seeking concessions

District of Coldstream municipal offices. (Morning Star file photo)
Coldstream staff recommend cutting outdated, conflicting policies

A staff report also calls for Kal Lak access protections in the next Official Community Plan

Doses of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine are seen being prepared on Wednesday, May 12, 2021, in Decatur, Ga. Hundreds of children, ages 12 to 15, received the Pfizer vaccine at the DeKalb Pediatric Center, just days after it was approved for use within their age group. (AP Photo/Ron Harris)
One death, 60 new cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health

The death is connected to the outbreak at Spring Valley long-term care in Kelowna

The. B.C. Court of Appeal granted a retrial to former Vernon man William Schneider, convicted of second-degree murder in the 2016 death of Japanese exchange student Natsumi Kogawa. The trial is set to begin May 24, 2022. (Vancouver Police Department photo)
Retrial date set for former Vernon man’s murder conviction

William Schneider’s trial, connected to the death of Natsumi Kogawa, is set for May 2022

Prince Rupert was one of the first B.C. communities targeted for mass vaccination after a steep rise in infections. Grey area marks community-wide vaccine distribution. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C. tracks big drop in COVID-19 infections after vaccination

Prince Rupert, Indigenous communities show improvement

The bodies of Carlo and Erick Fryer were discovered by a local couple walking on a remote forest road in Naramata on May 10. (Submitted)
Kamloops brothers identified as pair found dead near Penticton

The bodies of Carlo and Erick Fryer were discovered by a local couple walking

Municipal governments around B.C. have emergency authority to conduct meetings online, use mail voting and spend reserve funds on operation expenses. (Penticton Western News)
Online council meetings, mail-in voting option to be extended in B.C.

Proposed law makes municipal COVID-19 exceptions permanent

A nurse prepares a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in Kelowna on Tuesday, March 16. (Phil McLachlan/Black Press)
British Columbians aged 20+ can book for vaccine Saturday, those 18+ on Sunday

‘We are also actively working to to incorporate the ages 12 to 17 into our immunization program’

The AstraZeneca-Oxford University vaccine. (AP/Eranga Jayawardena)
2nd person in B.C. diagnosed with rare blood clotting after AstraZeneca vaccine

The man, in his 40s, is currently receiving care at a hospital in the Fraser Health region

Brian Peach rescues ducklings from a storm drain in Smithers May 12. (Lauren L’Orsa video screen shot)
VIDEO: Smithers neighbours rescue ducklings from storm drain

Momma and babies made it safely back to the creek that runs behind Turner Way

Signage for ICBC, the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia, is shown in Victoria, B.C., on February 6, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
$150 refunds issued to eligible customers following ICBC’s switch to ‘enhanced care’

Savings amassed from the insurance policy change will lead to one-time rebates for close to 4 million customers

Police investigate a fatal 2011 shooting in a strip mall across from Central City Shopping Centre, which was deemed a gang hit. The Mayor’s Gang Task Force zeroed in on ways to reduce gang involvement and activity. (File photo)
COVID-19 could be a cause in public nature of B.C. gang violence: expert

Martin Bouchard says the pandemic has changed people’s routines and they aren’t getting out of their homes often, which could play a role in the brazen nature of shootings

Tinder, an online dating application that allows users to anonymously swipe to like or dislike other’s profiles. (Black Press Media files)
B.C. man granted paternity test to see if Tinder match-up led to a ‘beautiful baby’

The plaintiff is seeking contact with the married woman’s infant who he believes is his child

Most Read