Members of the Métis society present a painting, along with bannock, jam and tea to health care workers at the Golden hospital to show their appreciation for them throughout the pandemic. (Claire Palmer photo)

Members of the Métis society present a painting, along with bannock, jam and tea to health care workers at the Golden hospital to show their appreciation for them throughout the pandemic. (Claire Palmer photo)

Columbia River Métis Society show support for Golden health care workers

A painting, along with bannock, jam and tea were presented to the hospital last week

The Métis Nation Columbia River Society are continuing to show its support for health care works in the community, following a ‘love-in’ in September, this week it presented butter and Saskatoon Jam with Labrador Tea for a coffee break at the Golden and District Hospital.

“Some months ago, after listening to the news and learning about the shortage of health care workers made worse by the pandemic and in conversations with some of our doctors and nurses, we learned that their morale was at an all time low,” said Davene Dunn of the Métis Society.

“Many have suffered from anxiety and depression, not to mention being extremely stressed and overworked.

When we noticed protests and demonstrations by anti-vaxxers taking place, we knew that we should do something to show support and our gratitude for always being there for our small community.”

In addition to the food and tea, the Métis society also presented a print of a painting to Dr. Meghan Guy, to be hung in the maternity ward at the hospital.

The painting, titled “You Come From The Stars”, was painted by Cree Métis artist, Dr. Karlee Fellner, and represents the teaching that we come into this physical world from the Pleiades via the umbilical cord, which anchors us to the Tree of Life within our mother.

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In the painting, heart berries, or strawberries, (otenimînak) emerging from the breasts represent the love and nourishment provided from the mother.

The Saskatoon berries (okonokistsi) depicted at the other end of the lodge/womb are one of the sacred medicines of the Blackfoot medicine.

Dr. Karlee gave birth at a birth lodge ceremony, and gifted a print of the painting to a member of her team, who in turn has passed it along to Golden in honour of other expectant mothers.

“As the pandemic goes on, we are all tired and our health care workers are more tired. They continue caring for us and we believe it is our responsibility to support them in any way we can and more importantly, to show them that we are grateful for their efforts and their dedication,” said Dunn.


Claire Palmer
Editor for the Golden Star
Email me at claire.palmer@thegoldenstar.net
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