It’s expensive for outsiders to be dead in this B.C. town

Grave prices set to discourage bargain hunters

Dying in the Town of Princeton is a lot cheaper if you happen to live here.

Prices for grave lots in the municipally-owned cemetery are more than six times what they cost residents, and they have been for several years.

“That’s fairly common practice anywhere in the province,” said James Graham, director of finance.

Graham said the fee structure helps to ensure the availability of the cemetery for residents, and discourages out-of-town bargain hunters.

Presently it costs a resident $330 to purchase a grave lot, and non-residents pay $2,290.

A portion of those charges, $120 and $240 respectively, are earmarked for a perpetual care fund to provide cemetery maintenance.

“The Town of Princeton is still one of the cheapest places in B.C. to spend eternity,” said Graham.

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andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

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