B.C. Green party leader Andrew Weaver is being lobbied by the Liberals and NDP for support. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

B.C. Green party leader Andrew Weaver is being lobbied by the Liberals and NDP for support. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

EDITORIAL: B.C. politics full of rhetoric

British Columbians finally know the outcome of the May 9 provincial election but things still aren’t that clear.

The Liberals have 43 seats, one short of a majority, while the NDP are nipping at the heels with 41 and the Greens have an unprecedented three seats.

As a result of these tight conditions, the Liberals and the NDP are both trying to bring the Greens to their respective side so they can form government. Not surprisingly they have taken to the media to state their case.

“With 43 B.C. Liberal candidates elected as MLAs, and a plurality in the legislature, we have a responsibility to move forward and form a government,” said Christy Clark, premier and Liberal leader.

Yes the Liberals have the most seats in the House but claims of plurality are tenuous when you remove one seat for the speaker and MLAs can’t always be present because of their duties. Clark is unable to do what she wants.

John Horgan, NDP leader, states, “British Columbians have voted overwhelmingly to replace Christy Clark’s Liberals with a new government that works better for families.”

It’s difficult to know how Horgan justifies those comments when the numbers are so close, and there’s nothing to indicate that a majority of voters want the NDP to govern.

In the end, politics in B.C. have always been wild and the next few weeks and months could be unprecedented. Hopefully the politicians keep their eye on the ball and serve the public’s interests.